SEVILLE

The history of Seville remounts prior to Al-Andalus, to the Roman period, today it stands as one of the key historical points on the Andalusian landscape. This is where the Almoravids settled in the early 11th Century, taking over Córdoba and the entire west of Andalusia. The ongoing battles against the Christians in the northern front had led the Almoravids in Sevilla to call in the more radical Almohads from Northern Africa for support. This, in turn, served to further intensify the already existing divisions in Islamic Spain. A turning point in Andalusian history was the battle of Navas de Tolosa, which took place in 1212 C.E. The Catholic-Christian alliance took over Cordoba in 1236 C.E. and Seville in 1248 C.E.

During this last period of Muslim rule, Sevilla became an important capital to the Christian monarchs, who would later become friendly with the Muslim sultans of Granada, receiving not only taxes but all sorts of gifts, artworks and handicrafts. A testimony of this is the incredible Alcázar Palace of Sevilla, “commissioned by Christian kings, built by Muslim craftsmen and financed by Jewish bankers,” another symbol of the tolerance and balance between these three cultures.